Petronius, Satyricon, 83

et Protogenis rudimenta cum ipsius naturae veritate certantia non sine quodam horrore tractavi.

...and I studied with a certain terrified wonder the rough drawings of Protogenes, which rivalled the truth of Nature herself. (M. Heselstine, 1913)

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  • Spyridon Loumakis

Ce n'est pas sans une certaine horreur que j'ai analysé les éléments de cette peinture où Potogène lutte de vérité avec la nature même. (A. Reinach, 1921).

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Created by Valérie Toillon
Contributors:
  • Spyridon Loumakis

Commentary

  1. "Protogenis rudimenta" is perhaps an allusion to some sketches by Protogenes. It could also be a pun on the word Πρωτογένης (Protogenes " the first-born") (Elsner, 1994, pp. 31-32; Croisille, 2003, p. 53).
  2. The “rivalry” between Nature and art, as manifested in Zeuxis' painting of the "Child and grape" (texts 236 and 237), is a well-known theme. This theme is also seen in the use of the word "veritas," here understood as "likeness of life in works of art"; Pollitt, 1974, pp. 176-182). About Protogenes and "veritas," see text 491.
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Created by Valérie Toillon
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  • Spyridon Loumakis

Bibliography

Croisille, J.-M. 2003, "« Pinacotheca mirabilis » : remarques sur Pétrone, « Satyricon » LXXXIII sq.", Mélanges C. Deroux. 4, pp. 50-60;

Elsner, J. 1994, "Seductions of Art: Encolpius and Eumolpus in a Neronian Picture Gallery", The Cambridge Classical Journal, 39, pp. 30-47;

Pollitt, J.J. 1974, The Ancient View of Greek Art, New Haven-London.

For the extended bibliography see 27.

Annotation Authors and Editors
Created by Valérie Toillon
Contributors:
  • Spyridon Loumakis